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Apr 20

Travel Around Kansas: Ideas for Weekend Road Trips

Posted to From the Reference Desk... by Sarah Tenfelde-Dubois

With spring in full swing, the State Library of Kansas has several books that might help you plan a weekend road trip.

Want to see the oldest public library this side of the Mississippi operated continuously in the same building since 1876?  Plan a road trip to Blue Rapids.

Want to do a Post Rock country tour?  Check out the Post Rock Scenic Byway in Russell County.

Would you like to know more about Laura Ingalls Wilder’s childhood home?  Head over to Independence.
 
These places are just a few examples of where you can experience getaways in Kansas.  There are unique places to learn more about, if you want to venture off the major highways.

Be sure to check with your local public library to see if they have similar titles. A few titles that might be helpful include:

Kansas Off the Beaten Path
 
Kansas Off the Beaten Path


Kansas Weekend Guide and Kansas Weekend Guide 2
Kansas Weekend Guide


Kansas Guidebook for Explorers
Kansas Guidebook for Explorers

Exploring Kansas
Exploring Kansas

8 Wonders of Kansas Guidebook
8 Wonders of Kansas Guidebook

Kansas Trail Guide
Kansas Trail Guide

Also, take a look at our book display to see if any other road trip titles sound interesting to you!
Road trip displays

Happy travels!

State Library of Kansas Reference
Reference: 785-296-2149
Legislative Hotline: 1-800-432-3919
E-mail: infodesk@ks.gov

Apr 20

Closing Kansas Rural Schools in the 1940s

Posted to KGI Online Library by Bill Sowers

In the early 1900s the rural population of Kansas began to decrease. With this loss of population came the  dissolution and consolidation of rural institutions.  One of the most important rural institutions was the rural school, popularly known as the "one-room schoolhouse."  As these schools, scattered all over the Kansas landscape, closed one by one, remaining students had to attend schools covering a greater geographic area.

The closure of rural schools in Kansas brought about dramatic changes in the school districts map of the state.  A legislative research report was ordered and published in 1942 which included statistics on school district closings, reasons for closings, the development of "school centers," changes in the school district taxing system, transportation costs in larger rural districts and state aid to education in Kansas.

The document, "Closed Schools in Kansas" (1942. Kansas Legislative Council Research Department), included a large map of the state indicating types of schools, school boundaries, schools closed or consolidated, and districts where students from closed schools were sent.  This map is an amazing look at loss of population in rural areas by looking at the closure of rural school districts.

We have this publication online at the State Library of Kansas' KGI Online Library, along with the large statewide map.  The map is located at the end of the online document.  It appears in eight separate sections which you can magnify to get a closer look at the districts and movement of students within the state. To zoom into a map just click on the "Download" tab on the top right of the page, click on "open" and then increase the percentage view of the pages.

CLOSED SCHOOLS IN KANSAS
(1942. Kansas Legislative Council. Research Department)


(Special thanks for making the map viewable goes to Trista Philippi)



Mar 22

Worth a second look: Universal Class

Posted to Librarian News by Jeff Hixon

From time to time, we like to draw attention to our growing list of archived webinar recordings. Maybe you missed one you had your heart set on joining, thought "I'll just catch the recording later!" - and then it got away from you.

This time, we're looking at Brad Gray's excellent overview of Universal Class from January 19.

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