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State Library's LIS Collection

How to Request Materials
If you would like to request this or other materials from the State Library of Kansas, please use your library’s established interlibrary loan process. This collection is supported in part by the Institute of Museum and Library Services through the Library Services and Technology Act, administered by the State Library of Kansas.

Nov 15

Engaging Babies in the Library (2016)

Posted on November 15, 2016 at 9:37 AM by Brian Herder

Engaging Babies in the Library

Engaging Babies in the Library (2016)

Debra J. Knoll

American Library Association

978-0-8389-1434-2


Public libraries across the nation continue to transform themselves into learning centers for infants, toddlers, and preschoolers. There are many resources available to help librarians create baby-friendly play spaces and enhanced storytimes, but until now there has been gap in the literature addressing the developmental needs and changing behaviors of babies and toddlers.  Parents and caregivers can also present unique service challenges. Focusing squarely on the how of providing quality library service to babies and families, Knoll’s new book provides sensible, sensitive advice on meeting their physical, emotional, intellectual, and social needs. Geared towards helping public libraries foster healthy growth and development for their littlest patrons, this book:

  • explores multiple aspects in the developing life of a baby, discussing physical needs, emotional expressions, intellectual pursuits, and social development;
  • highlights real-life examples from public libraries that relate to how these developmental processes present themselves while babies and families interact in the library;
  • presents Baby Steps for each topical area, providing service tips and suggestions that can be easily or inexpensively put into practice;
  • offers Big Steps, conversational points that invite librarians to think creatively about further investment, support, funding, and collaborative efforts; and
  • includes carefully selected research findings and other information that can be used for planning, policymaking, and advocacy.

With Knoll’s guidance, children‘s librarians will be informed and inspired to rise to the challenge of providing quality service to babies, toddlers, and care providers.

Nov 10

Digital Library Programs for Libraries and Archives (2016)

Posted on November 10, 2016 at 11:56 AM by Brian Herder

Digital Library Programs

Digital Library Programs for Libraries and Archives (2016)

Aaron D. Purcell

American Library Association

978-0-8389-1450-2


Planning and managing a self-contained digitization project is one thing, but how do you transition to a digital library program? Or better yet, how do you start a program from scratch? In this book Purcell, a well-respected expert in both archives and digital libraries, combines theory and best practices with practical application, showing how to approach digital projects as an ongoing effort. He not only guides librarians and archivists in transitioning from project-level initiatives to a sustainable program but also provides clear step-by-step instructions for building a digital library program from the bottom up, even for organizations with limited staff. Approachable and easy to follow, this book

  • traces the historical growth of digital libraries and the importance of those digital foundations;
  • summarizes current technological challenges that affect the planning of digital libraries, and how librarians and archivists are adapting to the changing information landscape;
  • uses examples to lay out the core priorities of leading successful digital programs;
  • covers the essentials of getting started, from vision and mission building to identifying resources and partnerships;
  • emphasizes the importance of digitizing original unique materials found in library and archives collections, and suggests approaches to the selection process;
  • addresses metadata and key technical standards;
  • discusses management and daily operations, including assessment, enhancement, sustainability, and long-term preservation planning;
  • provides guidance for marketing, promotion, and outreach, plus how to take into account such considerations as access points, intended audiences, and educational and instructional components;  and
  • includes exercises designed to help readers define their own digital projects and create a real-world digital program plan.

Equally valuable for LIS students just learning about the digital landscape, information professionals taking their first steps to create digital content, and organizations who already have well-established digital credentials, Purcell’s book outlines methods applicable and scalable to many different types and sizes of libraries and archives.

Nov 10

Adults Just Wanna Have Fun: Programs for Emerging Adults (2016)

Posted on November 10, 2016 at 11:45 AM by Brian Herder

Adults just wanna have fun

Adults Just Wanna Have Fun: Programs for Emerging Adults
(2016)


Audrey Barbakoff

American Library Association

978-0-8389-1391-8


There are a wealth of resources out there geared towards serving the needs of toddlers, school age children, young adults, and senior citizens. But something's missing. Library users in their 20s and 30s constitute one of the most underserved populations for public libraries, and there's a scarcity of guidance on how to target them. Barbakoff’s fun and practical programming book helps to fill that gap. A 2013 Library Journal Mover & Shaker who was also named one of Flavorwire’s “10 of the Coolest Librarians Alive,” she shows how to draw emerging adults to the library using a mixture of play and engagement and then keep them coming back for more. Packed with ideas that are real-world tested and approved, this guide  

  • examines the unique needs and expectations of millennials, many of whom are already avid readers and have the potential to become a core part of the public library user base;
  • presents easily adaptable programs that are fun for a variety of groups, from “Bad Art Night” and “DIY Hot Cocoa Mix” to “Library Speed Dating” and “Homemade Spa Products”;
  • features a range of events that move the library outside and into the community, such as hosting a book club in a bar, combining books and bikes, partnering with a commercial kitchen for a cookbook group, and a book-to-action program that uses book discussions as springboards to hands-on service projects;
  • offers advice for garnering funding and support by showing how to connect programming to the library’s fundamental values; and
  • provides tips for prep, setup, and teardown, plus pointers on marketing and outreach.

By taking the initiative to offer programming that appeals to emerging adults, public libraries help to make them life-long library users. It’s an investment that will reap benefits for years to come, and this book shows how to make it happen.